Tales of a Blue Collar Academic – or – What I Did This Summer (instead of write)

This summer was supposed to be incredibly productive. I was going to write for several hours each day, and then spend another several hours on home improvement. I was going to have a well-balanced summer that would create good habits leading into the school year.

But Murphy and his “law” had other plans for me and for my family. Why am I telling you this? Because, as a first generation, blue collar academic, I want you to know that it’s OK to struggle and it’s OK to blend your skill sets into something that is uniquely you.

Continue reading Tales of a Blue Collar Academic – or – What I Did This Summer (instead of write)

Publication: “Marianne Weber and the March For Our Lives Movement”

Today’s blog post is going to be short and sweet, because I get to brag a little but but don’t like to talk about myself.

I wrote a chapter for a book, and that book has been published, has landed in hard copy on my doorstep, and is for sale on Amazon. I’m chapter three.

Close-up of the table of contents for part I: Forgotten Founders. Chapter 1 is "John Stuart-Glennie's Lost Legacy," by Eugene Halton. Chapter 2 is "Annie Marion MacLean and Sociology at the University of Chicago and Hull House" by Mary Jo Deegan, and Chapter 3, "Marianne Weber and the March for Our Lives Movement" by me, Stacy L. Smith.

I’m sure that someday I will become jaded to such things, but I suspect that day will be a long time coming.

The book is intended for use in undergraduate theory classes, for the purpose of bringing marginalized or forgotten theorists back into the classroom? Did you know that Max Weber’s wife, Marianne, was well-respected and well-known in her time — at one point more so than hubby Max?

You can buy it here, or tell your library that you want a copy 🙂

Book cover for Forgotten Founders and Other Neglected Social Theorists. The cover shows the title, the editors (Christopher Conner, Nicholas Baxter, and David Dickens, over a picture of an old typewriter.
Book cover for Forgotten Founders and Other Neglected Social Theorists

 

 

 

From Summer Blues to Summer Success: How to Navigate a Summer (or Winter) Intersession Course

I’m going to be blunt: summer and winter intersession courses are hard.

Very hard.

If you want to successfully complete an intersession course, this post is for you.

Continue reading From Summer Blues to Summer Success: How to Navigate a Summer (or Winter) Intersession Course

I say “grade-grubbing,” you say “it doesn’t hurt to ask:” on asking teachers to “bump” your final grade

The semester is over, and you’re in that limbo where all of your assignments have been turned in but the teacher hasn’t assigned final grades yet. It doesn’t look like you earned the grade you’d hoped for. Do you:

Email the teacher, asking them to raise your final grade to the next level?

Or

Accept that you earned what you earned and you need to try better next time?

Over 100 college professors weighed in to help you answer that question. Read on!

Continue reading I say “grade-grubbing,” you say “it doesn’t hurt to ask:” on asking teachers to “bump” your final grade

Guest Spot: My Interview with Undergrad Made Easier

I’m so excited! My friends Adam and Dinur asked me to be the first guest interview for their podcast, Learning Made Easier. We’re all college professors that care about how well our students learn, and there’s something in the podcast for students and teachers alike. I had great fun, and I hope that you will enjoy it, too! Click the image, below, to go to the podcast and transcript.
Continue reading Guest Spot: My Interview with Undergrad Made Easier

Peer Reviewed, Academic, and Reputable Sources: What the Heck are They and How Do I Find Them?

If you’re writing a college-level research paper, most likely your instructor has told you that you must use a certain type of “source.” The language used to describe these sources varies, but in general, your teacher expects you to use high-quality sources for the information in your paper. Let’s take this concept apart so you have a better understanding of exactly what your teacher expects.

Continue reading Peer Reviewed, Academic, and Reputable Sources: What the Heck are They and How Do I Find Them?

How is College Writing Different?

In one of my earliest blog posts, Learning to Write Well: Why Bother?, I wrote that you will likely need to be able to write effectively throughout your life, whether that’s for professional or personal reasons. Writing for college classes, however, is a very specific type of writing that requires a specific skill set. A lot of students come into college missing at least some of these skills. In a later post, I will talk about imposter syndrome and why students enter college with varying levels of preparation, but for now, just know that a lot of students enter college these days without the skills they need to write a successful college paper. That’s literally the reason this blog exists.

Not knowing what’s expected of your academic writing in college is not a measure of intelligence; it is a measure of preparedness and understanding.

So let’s get started.

Continue reading How is College Writing Different?